Category Archives: The High Road

Transformation and Healing in Relationships

pexels-photo-326625.jpegRelationships are created to assist both souls learn their lessons and balance their misdirected energy. When the lesson is learned, the karma is cleared and the contract has been fulfilled. Choosing to stay in these relationships becomes a choice. If both souls are willing to retrieve their lessons, step into a place of healing, and shift their consciousness, the relationship will evolve from one based on karma to one infused with the new energy and transformation.

Unfortunately, some souls do not always choose to evolve and heal. Some souls will choose to stay in the old energy where they will continue to recreate the same lessons over and over again, keeping them stuck in drama, trauma, and chaos. It will be very important for those of us choosing to take the high road (e.g., love) to not get caught up into other’s despair, confusion, and denial. This can be very hard to do because we care about the other person. However, we must respect their freedom to choose.

Compassionate detachment and discernment are absolutely necessary if we plan on continuing with our own personal healing and transforming our energy from hate into love. The one rule of all living things is our freedom of will, and many of us have given our freedom of will away. We must learn to say “no” when we need to, and “yes” when we feel it is for our highest good. Each of us must learn to stand in our own power and learn to discern what is a good investment of our time and energy.

Staying involved in toxic relationships will deplete us and keep us from moving forward (ultimately, it will keep the other from moving forward as well!) on our own soul’s advancement. The only person we are responsible for is our self. Everything outside ourselves is merely a reflection of the relationships we are having with our own inner being.

We teach others how to treat us by the way we treat ourselves, so when we make ourselves of equal value and stop sacrificing our energy in order to please others, we will build a sense of personal power, helping us to set up very strong boundaries. Keeping ourselves fully anchored on a love-based path by choosing not to get caught up in relationships that suck us dry and deplete our energy is not selfish; it actually serves the whole of humanity. We cannot be of service to humanity if we continue to allow others to pulls us down into the lower ego-based energies of confusion, chaos, denial, limited beliefs, addiction and drama. We need to pull ourselves out of denial and be really honest with ourselves and ask if our current relationships are based on Love or fear.

If they are based in fear, you will need to love yourself enough to disengage from anything that is disempowering and does not serve your highest good. Recognize your mistakes, bringing them into your awareness so you can transcend them. All mistakes should be immediately dealt with so the imbalanced energy will not be returned to you. The relationships here are the toxic ones where there is a split. One soul chooses to awaken and step into their empowerment, while the other soul chooses to stay in denial and refuses to change and accept responsibility for their unconscious creations. These souls will no longer be a good match, and will only create continued disharmony for each other. It will be up to you to listen to your heart when it tells you your contract with another soul is complete.

The only person who can decide this is you. You have total free will to choose which relationships serve you and which ones deplete you. If this relationship is meant to be a part of your life, give it the space it needs to heal. Release it with Love knowing that it will be returned to you if it is for your highest good. The highest way we can be of service to others is to stay in the higher vibrations of love, joy, peace, compassion, forgiveness and understanding, setting an example for others to follow.

On person holding their mastery core and radiating their energy can transmute the fear energy of hundreds of people who choose to keep themselves in limitation and fear. Set an example that others will want to follow. When we remain in the higher frequencies we lift each other up!

Each of us will need to stay in alignment with our spirit, listen to our heart, and choose not to allow other people’s unconscious behaviors, motivated by their ego, throw us out of alignment with our core. Stepping into a place of detachment, surrender, and allowance for others is absolutely necessary. They have free will and every right to choose to stay stagnant in their soul’s evolution. It will become imperative to look at everything from a bigger perspective, instead of from a human perspective and know that there is always divine order and a bigger picture in every event that occurs.

We are all on different consciousness levels with the free will to choose whether we want to move towards the higher energy of Love or stay stuck in the lower energy realms of limitation. Sometimes it takes others more time and many more lives before they will finally surrender their ego and move forward into enlightenment.

The best way to live, is to always ask yourself:
Is this relationship, activity, thought, or belief:
1) For my highest good?
2) A wise energy investment?
3) Going to enhance or deplete my light?
4) In line with my being?
5) Contracting my energy through fear or expanding my energy with love?

*Disclaimer: I found this in my diary from way back. It must be from some class I took, and I don’t remember which one it was or who it was by. Possibly Abraham Hicks?

Am I Nice?

We all think we are a nice person, and when we act in an unloving way, we justify it by blaming the other person’s behavior. Sometimes we believe that by being “mean back” in those moments, we can teach them a lesson, or “inspire” them to change.

Mathematically, that equation simply doesn’t add up. It is impossible to use a negative action, like anger, to produce positive genuine actions, like love.

Maybe the other person’s behavior is intolerable, but when we use their behavior to justify being intolerable ourselves, we mold ourselves into that same ugliness we are trying to change.

To continue having a bad attitude because “someone did something you didn’t like” will only end up with us hating ourselves. We slowly become more and more like the person we despise. When we do not like ourselves, all we get is unhappiness, bitterness, loneliness, and neediness. So if you think about it, KINDNESS and LOVE always win.

Everyone Can Be a Winner (Even the “Losers”)

The new audio book “The Book of Joy” about Desmund Tutu and the Dalai Lama (by Douglas Carlton) came out and I’ve been listening to it on my long commutes to and from work. This morning they spoke of the famous “Golden Rule” (treat others how you want to be treated) but expanded on it. The topic was about how suffering often leads to joy, and those that have little suffers, tend to complain more and not have much joy. They spoke of how those that suffer (and grow from it) tend to be more capable of maintaining calm in the midst of chaos, and it is this calmness that helps others find calm as well.

Then something clicked when they said, “You must LONG for the best of the other as you want the best for you…”

This meant that deep inside your heart, you had to genuinely wish for the other what you had genuinely wanted for yourself.

To clear myself from any resentment and negative feelings about the loss of my marriage, I have been praying every morning and night for my husband. Although he has left me, I pray that he gets everything he wants, and that he has lasting inner peace, profound joy, and an abundance of unconditional love. This thought did NOT come natural, and for the first few days, it was just “fake it till you make it”. My anger and hurt were too strong for me to actually feel that sincerely. Now, several weeks in, I can say I truly do wish that he receives everything he could possibly desire, and that he is head deep in inner peace, full of joy, and receiving true unconditional love. Why? Because he needs it!

Sharon Salzberg and Robert Thurman, in their book, “Love Your Enemies” explain it this way:

“Love wishes the real happiness of the beloved. It is a partner to compassion, which wishes the beloved not to suffer. If you think about it, it is highly rational to love our enemies, with LOVE defined as wanting them to be really happy. They are only our enemies because they think of us as preventing their happiness. If they become really happy without having to get us out of their way, then they will not bother being our enemies anymore. The more happiness they feel, they might actually come to love us….or at least leave us alone.”

Yes… This is what I wanted. If he couldn’t love me, at least I could hope that his happiness would be so overly abundant that he would no longer wish to hurt me, verbally attack me, and continue hurting himself and exposing our baby to his sex, alcohol, and gambling addictions (and the emotional negative repercussions that spew out of them). If he was truly happy, would he even want to have those dangerous and hurtful addictions? I bet he wouldn’t…

This thought process, connected with the “Golden Rule” got me thinking: If my husband saw me as the enemy, someone who had taken from him what was so important to him (to get a green card) was there some way I could some how get out of that “enemy spot light” he held me under? What in my behavior was contributing to his thinking that I had literally ruined his life? Granted, there are some things that just won’t change, like his narcissistic thinking that actually believes that me choosing divorce instead of staying in a sham marriage and accepting his cheating and lying was somehow an unloving thing for me to do. That aside, there had to be some way in which my choice of words, or my “method of communication” was coming off, to him, as insulting and offensive. Could there be a way in which we both were “winners”? I.e., can I say what needs to be said in a way that he doesn’t feel like I’m attacking him?

I’m not sure of the author, but I love the quote: ”

“I’m responsible for what I say, not for what you understand”

While this opens the door for me to say what is in my heart, it still remains a very hefty burden. We should always be mindful about what we say. Sometimes it’s not necessary. Sometimes it is not helpful. And sometimes, while we may believe it, it may not be absolutely true. Taking responsibility for our words, being honest with our intentions, and being able to identify what really needs to be said, and what can be left alone, we can then communicate with our best intentions and then leave the interpretation to the listener. If you get a “bad listener” (someone who is always defensive, deflective, or reactive) you have to just let it go. You did your best. If you get a good listener, even if they may take offense, the conversation opens up for a genuine understanding and hopefully, reconciliation.

Unfortunately, my husband is less than skillful in the listening department, but that only means that I can choose to be more skillful in the “delivering necessary messages” department.

Since our separation, my baby has come back from his father’s home sick 3 times. Once with the flu, once with Pneumonia, and once with a fever/cold. While my husband blamed it on everything but himself, my gut reaction was to blame him for not being more careful about where he took the baby, proper hygiene, his choice to refuse my baby my breast milk, and basic parental negligence. Is there a loving way of saying that? NOPE!

Instead of saying:

The baby got sick AGAIN. Every time he comes home from being with you he gets sick…you really need to pay attention to keeping him away from unhealthy places, people, and be mindful about proper hygiene…and for god’s sake, give him my breast milk! I worked hard at pumping all of that!

I could either say nothing and just take care of the baby, or if I really wanted to make it clear that the baby was sick, I could say:

Just wanted to let you know that the baby has a fever. I will take the weekend to let him rest and recover so that he will be healthy and ready to play the next time he sees you.

Here’s another quote I love:

“Since enemies engage our energies of anger and fear,
our main weapons against them are
wisdom, tolerance, compassion, and love.”
-Sharon Salzberg & Robert Thurman

In thinking about how much I long to feel respected, loved, and supported, what greater opportunity to show respect, love, and support!! I was always cringing when my phone went off, hoping, praying, begging the universe that it not be ANOTHER negative and hateful text from my husband… Yet, I too, was equally guilty of sending less than loving, self-victimizing messages. So there you have it.

“You must long for the best of the other as you want the best for you…”

WIN-WIN!

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Life Sucks…But Not All The Time.

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“Life Sucks…” was my initial thought after a few months after I made the decision to stay married to my sex addict husband. The idea of staying committed to a man that was psychologically incapable of refraining from infidelity sounded like insanity.

Learning of the endless betrayals, it is tempting to make some serious judgments about him, leading me to a great amount of bitterness, hatred, resentment, and thinking he is the lowest piece of scum on this planet. When I go “there”, there is no one (in my mind) who could be more sick, delusional, disgusting and mean than my husband.

Nearly three years into this insanity, however, I’d have to admit there have been more good times than bad, more laughter than tears, and more kind words than bad. But when it gets bad, it is baaaaaaaad, and in those moments, it feels like the level of badness far outweighs the level of goodness.

There’s this truth about life, however, that will always remain so long as we are humans on this Earth, and that is that although we make every effort to pursue and obtain a life of happiness, peace, and drama-free days, life is always changing, full of disappointments, loss, pain, and betrayal. It doesn’t matter who you are with. And while we can pick and choose who we spend our lives with (yes, we always have the choice and freedom to leave any relationship), we will always be presented with problems.

That’s life. And yeah, it sucks sometimes.

It’s easy to forget, though, that it doesn’t suck all the time.

Being married to an addict sucks (I don’t think there’s a soul in the world who would disagree with me), but that doesn’t mean my life sucks. What I’m coming to learn is that assuming life will always present challenges, how we grow through those challenges ultimately results in our strengthened ability to navigate through those challenges. I’ve learned more and grown more (spiritually, mentally and in so many other aspects) being married to my husband than at any other point in my life. Admittedly, when things are going great, I don’t grow at all. It’s very comfortable and I like to go to auto-pilot mode.

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I was in my ladies bible study last night. We had discussed the issue of lying and how lying was seen by God as equal to all other sins (I’m not trying to bring up a discussion on this, so please don’t tell me this is not true. I get that enough from my husband). I had told them how my husband kept lying and excused himself saying “at least I’m not doing really bad things like killing people”. I thought that if he saw that lying was not insignificant but actually very bad, he would stop lying (or at least try to be less dishonest).

One of the ladies stopped me and asked me about my own sin and how that compared to his. Ouch… That was like a slap in the face to reality. If I am saying that all sin is equal in the eyes of God, how can I complain that my husband’s sin is greater than that of my own? Am I saying that I am sin-free? I want to say that I am, but we all know that isn’t true. If all sin is equal, who am I to put the spotlight on his sin and off of my own? I wanted to say “well, at least I don’t repeat my sin like he does!” but it all goes back to “Who’s inventory am I taking here?”

Addiction is no joke. It’s got some serious consequences and it hurts people in so many ways. He’s got a ton of issues that he has to work on. But part of my “sin” (in addition to being super judgmental and holding an attitude of superiority) is me trying to act like God. When he sins, I feel justified in intervening, insisting on sharing my “insightful wisdom”. After all, his behavior does directly affect me, our marriage, and our family. That’s my excuse- my rationale for keeping the spotlight on him and off myself.

If I do put the spotlight on myself, I realize that although he makes choices that do hurt us, that doesn’t mean that I can’t work on my own issues and support him while he works through his. Maybe he can even support me as I work through mine. It’s no fun, for sure. Saying it sucks is far from being an understatement.

I have to remind myself often, “this is not personal…this is not personal…” even though it feels VERY personal. Oh how life sucks…sometimes…

But, not all the time. Assuming challenges never go away so long as we are human beings on this Earth, it is important to make the most of it. Some prefer pissing and moaning about the transgressions of another, because they are either too blind or self-righteous (like me) to believe they have issues to work on themselves, or they are Jesus/Buddha/Muhammad. I’m willing to put all my money it’s the former.

Yes, life can suck. Really, really suck… But serenity comes when we accept the things that we cannot change (and unfortunately, my husband and his behavior falls into that category). What I have learned is that, although I am perfectly justified to leave, since I have chosen to stay (for now) I have two options on how to make the most of my time. I can use this limited time on earth to focus on the transgressions of others, searching, controlling, and manipulating them to be, act, and say things the way I think they should (guaranteeing I will forever be disappointed, sad, angry, bitter, hurt, living in fear, insecurity, and darkness. There is no end.) OR I can spend this limited amount of time on earth focusing on my own issues (i.e., how I can be a better person, a better mother, better friend, a better driver, a better pet owner, a better money-spender, more honest, more authentic, more sensitive, etc.,) there seems to be a light at the end of the tunnel. There is a sense of hope. Faith. Happiness. I feel like progress is being made (even if it’s just me). There is healing. There is freedom. There is life.

Playing Bad Cards

bad cards

We are all dealt our own unique cards in life. Some people get a good hand. Some get a crappy hand. But in the end, when the game is over, we all end up in the same place (dead). So how do I want to spend my time until then? I.e., how do I win with the crappy cards I was given?

Pissing and moaning about the dealer? Holding resentment towards those that seem to have gotten the better hand? Steal their cards? Cheat? Drink myself to oblivion or dive into other addictions so I don’t have to feel as bad about my crappy hand?

What if I have fun and play my best, no matter how crappy it may seem? I might not beat the others by wiping them out but I will win by finding joy that AT LEAST I can play.

I might find joy in the game simply by learning, growing, making friends, sharing our “secrets” to the joy-finding approach.

IN the end, I might even realize it wasn’t a game of me vs you or even me vs the cards. Maybe it wasn’t even a game.

Some people like to stay sitting at the table, hoping for a better hand. I admit, I was one of those people thinking that if I stayed in the game long enough, maybe my luck would change. Now I’m starting to realize there was only one player at the table and it was me! Life is too short to stay there!

Who is making all these rules anyway? Who assigned the value of the cards? Who decides if the cards in your hand are even crappy or not?

It’s time to live!

Forgiveness is a Process

Ouchie-Blue-p

Forgiveness isn’t something you do. It’s a process you actually have to go through. Sometimes the process is short and can end with a simple “I’m sorry”, and sometimes it takes a long time.

Give yourself a break. If you are struggling with forgiveness, you don’t have to feel bad. Even paper cuts take time to heal. If you’ve been stabbed in the back, of course it’s going to take a lot longer to heal that one.

Daily Reminder: Forgiveness is a process.

Taking Things Personally When It’s Personal – How Relationships Suffer Through Differences in Reality

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One of the greatest sources of suffering in a relationship is our refusal to accept our differences. I’d be willing to bet the fastest way to end any relationship is to determine in our mind that our reality is either better or correct compared to another. The fact is, sometimes people do things that hurt us. Sometimes it is physical, and sometimes it is emotional. While the pain we may have experienced is real, however, rather than focus on what harm the other has caused us, I believe what is really important is the intention behind it.

How do we know the intention was to cause some kind of pain? Maybe they did it to make themselves feel better, bigger, stronger, more powerful, less scared, more secure, smarter, or maybe it was even done for something more complicated, like addiction or some other mental health issue. Maybe it was an accident. Who knows?

Where we often get stuck is when we decide that we know what their real intentions were, but until we develop some serious ESP powers, there is no human alive that can know what another person’s true intentions are. That is why we have to communicate in order to find out. That means having an open mind and calming down just enough to get ego and emotions out of the way. Communication doesn’t happen- in fact it CAN’T happen- when either of the parties is either flaming mad or already decided that he/she is right and the other is wrong. Maybe they are, but maybe they aren’t. That’s what this communication thing is for. The goal isn’t to determine who is right and who is wrong, but respecting how both are right in their own way, and how to move forward with the differences.

assume

Ironically, however, it’s important to acknowledge that whether you know it or not, you have hurt people in some way as well, and for as long as you may live, you will continue to hurt people even if you don’t mean to. That is the nature of our existence as humans. We may not have done it on purpose but conflict is the natural result of living in a world with someone other than ourselves, and in a world of so much diversity. You simply cannot exist without having some kind of impact (good or bad) on another living being, and the conflict (or love) that arises out of it is simply two different things bumping into one another. The result is either an attraction or avoidance.

Unfortunately, on Earth, difference is unavoidable, and it is good! Just like light and darkness, warmth and cold, polarities all serve a very important purpose in the world. Remember though: while we may have a number of differences, we also share a number of similarities (good and bad).

In our relations with other living beings we also have a polarity of intentions. Either we have good/loving/caring intentions or bad/hateful/harming intentions (and sometimes no intentions at all). I would like to believe I always have good intentions, but the truth is sometimes I don’t, and I doubt I’m the only one.

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Understanding intentions can be really hard. Sometimes our emotions or ego can scream so loudly that we can’t hear what’s truly going on behind our actions. But if we can get ourselves back to that calm state of mind and identify what our intentions are, we can make better decisions on how to move forward by taking an honest inventory of our own intentions. I recently had a big fight with my partner and the old me would have threatened everything, blindly believing that my threat was my way of expressing my feelings, stating my bottom line, and saying “NO!” to inappropriate behavior. “I am being assertive!” I would proudly convince myself. In reality, my intention was to get him to stop doing what he was doing. My intention was to change him so that I could have what I wanted (and to remind him of how right I was and how wrong he was).

In the moment of intense emotions, and when ego steps in, our ability to connect with our true intentions (and feelings) is completely destroyed. Identifying our intentions means being excruciatingly honest with ourselves and others and that means putting all those hurt feelings aside and looking at the situation from a different perspective. Impossible? No. But definitely a challenge. And if it’s hard for us to identify our intentions right away, it most certainly is for others as well. That said, when you do get offended or hurt, don’t jump to conclusions about what the other person was trying to do or say.

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If we were to break it all down, basically when we end up bumping into our contrasting parts (i.e., any other living thing), the biggest problem is that we look at the other person’s behavior as either a complement to our goals or an interruption, and naturally end up taking it personally. If they did something that helped you, or made you feel good, you saw them in a positive light. If they did something that was unhelpful, disappointing, or set you back, you saw it in a negative light. But if they did something great, can you call them great? Then when they fail, are they no longer great? Keep in mind, even when people do awesome things for us, we still should not take it personally. That’s right, even when they treat you like a queen/king, unfortunately, it doesn’t mean that you are one.

But what if their action was personal? What if they intentionally did or said something to you that was meant to hurt you? Well, first of all, how do you know? Did they say directly to you that their intention was to hurt you, demean you, and cause you some kind of pain? If they knew that they were hurting you, would they do that?

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I remember a quote by Don Miguel Ruiz about taking things personally:

“Taking things personally is the maximum expression of selfishness because we make the assumption that the whole world is all about ME.”

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Even if the other person’s action was an intentional attack upon you, it has absolutely nothing to do with you. While they have no right to try and change you, similarly, you have no right to change them. The only right you have is to assertively and kindly express your reality and leave it at that.

To put so much power onto another person by allowing their behavior to affect you, you have put all your trust into something outside of yourself. In a sense, you are saying, “my reality is determined by what you do or say to me.”

I’ll be the first to admit, it’s not easy to just let something go, especially when the person you are at odds with is someone you love very deeply. We don’t want to end the relationship. Nor do we want to continue feeling so sad from the result of our loved one’s actions. So what do you do when you aren’t in danger and you don’t necessarily want to end the relationship?

Boundaries

Boundaries.

Creating healthy boundaries is only something you can do and can actually be a gift to the other person (even if at first they don’t like it). When you make clear what you are willing and not willing to live with, you have given the other person the gift of clearly knowing what you need in order to maintain that relationship. Then they get to choose if they can live with that boundary. If they choose to deny those boundaries, it doesn’t mean they don’t exist. It means they have chosen to end the relationship.

Boundaries aren’t demands that state what the other person can and cannot do, and your boundaries aren’t for them- They are for you.

Boundaries are like traffic lights that tell you when you need to stop, be cautious, or go forward. Others aren’t responsible for your boundaries. Only you are. Just like driving a car, you are the driver of your life. It’s your job to identify the boundaries you need and maintain them.

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After that, whatever happens is up to you. And that’s a good thing. Because it means that you are choosing all of this for yourself (freedom from, or acceptance of a given situation that was caused as a natural result of living around other living things). You are not a victim. You are not entitled to anything. Nor are you right and the other wrong. After establishing your boundaries, if you choose to run an obvious red light, the end result is on you.

In the end, all you can ethically and realistically do, if you have created and kept your healthy boundaries, and the other person still failed to acknowledge or respect them, is stop complaining and walk away from that person completely. It really is that simple.

Healthy Boundaries – The Key to a Healthy & Happy Life

healthy boundariesWe often confuse setting boundaries with shutting people out or being selfish. In fact, more often than not, when you enforce boundaries with people who are not use to having boundaries, it is likely they will react negatively and call you controlling, a b*tch, and other harsh accusatory names. Don’t bend! Why? Because setting healthy boundaries is quite the opposite of what many people believe and can save you a lifetime of drama once you understand the concept.

Setting healthy boundaries means creating limits to protect your integrity, your energy, home, money, health, children, priorities, your relationships, and more. Healthy boundaries, however, is NOT controlling someone or making rules for others to live by.

Creating healthy boundaries do not push people away or control other’s behavior. Quite the opposite of what is believed, creating healthy boundaries for yourself promotes healthy relationships because there is a clear line of who you are and what you stand for (providing true visibility for those who wish to respect you), and allows yourself to give fully from a genuine and healthy place.

So what are some types of healthy boundaries? To start, here are a few that I’ve found helpful to remember when dealing with people (work, romance, friends, family, etc.):

* I will not be involved with a person whose words and actions don’t align.

* I will not be in a relationship with a deceitful person.

*I will not give up my passions (reading, writing, yoga, meditation) for anyone.

* I will not tolerate abusive behavior of any kind to others or self.

Setting healthy boundaries is actually pretty easy. It’s enforcing them that is hard. We usually know what we like and don’t like (what we allow and what we will not allow). But when it comes to actually following through on them…. we get stuck.

In short: Don’t make boundaries you can’t follow through on. But if they are important boundaries that your personal mental and physical health require, keep the boundary and fight for the inner strength to follow through on creating and maintaining your boundaries. Your boundaries are key to emotional/physical safety, healthy relationships, and a happy life.

Saying Sorry When You’ve Done Nothing Wrong

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“Apologizing does not always mean that you’re wrong and the other person is right. It just means that you value
your relationship more than your ego.”

When someone tells us that something we’ve done or said has somehow hurt or offended them, our natural instinct is to defend ourselves. And while it is easier to apologize for something that we have clearly made a mistake for, as I’ve recently witnessed, some people will flat out say, “the hell I’m gonna apologize! I didn’t do anything!”

And while it may be completely true that we didn’t do anything intentionally to cause another discomfort or pain, an apology isn’t taking the blame for that pain and discomfort. I repeat: An apology IS NOT taking the blame for the other person’s pain and discomfort. An apology is an expression of compassion, acknowledging that the other person has been hurt. It’s about respecting that they feel pained. Yet so many people automatically connect apologizing with being at fault.  This even stands true when the person that has been hurt flat out tells you it’s your fault. Assuming you did not intentionally hurt that person, even if you know it isn’t your fault, being confronted about our actions hurts and not much helps take the feeling away that their accusation is personal- as if you are under attack and falsely accused of something you didn’t do.

etiquette-for-apologizingSo why apologize?

  • We apologize because we appreciate making things right over making someone take the blame.
  • We apologize not for what we have done but because we are compassionate enough human beings to not completely invalidate someone else’s emotions for the sake of being right.
  • We apologize because we are mature enough to realize that sometimes our actions affect other people more than they affect ourselves.
  • We apologize because we recognize that feeling sorry for someone and feeling regret about something are two very different things, requiring two very different emotions.
  • We apologize because we value the relationship more than our ego.
  • We apologize because we know the cost of not apologizing has negative long-term affects on our emotional and social well-being.
  • We apologize because even if the other person does not accept our apology, we have “cleansed” ourselves from wrong-doing and have allowed the other an opportunity to take some responsibility towards the healing from their pain.

In adult-world, it’s called “taking the high road” or choosing peace over contempt. Taking this path requires courage, bravery, a strong sense of confidence, and identity.

In all cultures and religions around the planet, one theme always remains consistent: Treat others as you would like to be treated.

Especially when we are not aware that we have somehow caused another some kind of pain, it is important to acknowledge their pain. To not do so risks the end of important or potential relationships. It also prevents us from possibly learning something about ourselves (that we unintentionally have the power to hurt other people and thus have the power to make things right).

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Yes, you have the power to make the world a better place, and all with a simple 2 letter word: “I’m sorry”.
Or, if you really want to make it clear that you didn’t mean to cause any such feelings/harm, you could add a few words clarifying that you had no intention of causing them any pain.

A common theme I heard from some people on the side of not apologizing was that the people being “hurt” were just being dramatic, or trying to be “superior”. It is very tempting and all too easy for us to attempt to play the role of “God” and ensure that they do not get to be superior to us, and that they are not allowed to play drama queen. We believe we are showing “tough love” in that we are helping them deal with the harsh realities of life – that it’s hard and we don’t always get the apology we think we deserve. We might even think that we are showing them who’s boss- falsely believing that an apology from us is a confession of our own weakness or cowardice.

lion truthI love the quote, “The truth is like a lion. You don’t have to defend it. Let it loose. It will defend itself”. I’m not talking about drastic scenarios here. I’m still talking about low-key stuff. If it’s an obvious offense, it required alternate actions, but in cases like these, if the person claiming they’ve been hurt is saying they’re hurt, they are entitled to those feelings. Why are they hurt? How were they hurt? Are they just drama queens trying to get some attention? That doesn’t matter as much as the separation it has caused. And that’s where the apology serves it’s purpose. The great thing about an apology is, if it’s done right the first time, it doesn’t have to be done again. Do it and get it over with. The rest (healing) is largely on their shoulders now.

If I had one piece of take-home advice, it would be this: You can apologize and still be right in what you’ve done or said (or didn’t do and didn’t say), and still allow the other person to feel the way they feel. Just because they feel a certain way doesn’t assume you are the bad guy.

Lastly, remember that while some of us need to learn how to apologize, many also need to learn how to forgive. Both equally difficult, but equally possible.

“Negative and Positive Energy” – WTF does it mean?

The Super Easy & Simplified Explanation of “Energy” and How You Have The Power To Change It

I was 29 when I first heard about “energy” and had no clue what it meant. My family-friend who had always inspired me (and ended up being my “spiritual adviser” (a.k.a. the one who kept me real when things got bad in life) was telling me about personal responsibility, and how if I focus on how I perceive the bad stuff that is happening to me as bad stuff, it feels worse (both physically and emotionally) than if I were to find the “blessing” in it. This was my first exposure to this kind of thinking and the concept is still a little vague to me. One thing for sure though, is I had realized I had spent 29 years of my life blaming others for disappointing me and hurting me and needlessly suffering for 29 years. And this was my first experience with “energy”, which at first sounds like a bunch of spiritual mumbo-jumbo, but is in fact, a simple truth to the basic human psychology. I believe that if you can master this, you will have ultimately mastered your mind.

spiritual energy

So what is “energy”?
The complicated version: Energy is basically anything and everything and it can move to anywhere and anyone at anytime from anyone and anywhere at anytime. It is from an infinite source in which no one can take too much and there not be enough for someone else. It can be positive energy, negative energy, or the “blah” kind of energy, and you can take as much or as little as you want, whenever you want. You can share it with billions of people and still have your share, if not more.

The simple version: The feeling and/or emotion you have at any moment in time. If you want to feel good, you can. If you want to feel bad, you can. And if you want to feel blah, you can. Neither kind of energy is valued as “good” or “bad”. It’s just energy, and it can be helpful or detrimental, depending on how you use it because the catch is… it’s contagious… For example, if you saw a horrible vicious attack on an innocent victim and you felt enraged, it’s not necessarily “bad” energy, because it’s a “negative” event, nor is “rage” a negative feeling. That rage could be just what you need to stand up for justice and protect that person (or even inspire others to stand up with you in solidarity- maybe even start a movement!). Similarly, let’s say you had a burst of “joy” seeing someone you didn’t like suffering a little (admit it, we all have that feeling). It’s a “nice” feeling (oooooh, that lovely feeling of revenge…), but that “nice” feeling isn’t necessarily positive enough to make the world (or you) a better place or person. And sometimes we don’t feel anything, and that’s fine. Not everything, nor every moment needs you to feel something or respond to right away, or ever.

So as you can see, the skillful recognition, understanding, and management of how and when we use these energies is ultimately what makes the difference in creating the life that makes us happy, successful, fulfilled, and productive.

Now for my personal experience…(What would a blog be without the personal touch?)

A few months ago, I learned of the ultimate betrayal towards me. My heart was crushed. My world came crumbling down on my physically and emotionally. I didn’t know what to do or even how to feel. It was like negative energy and blah energy at the same time. I wanted to scream, and escape, while at the same time, I didn’t know if I was sad, mad, or simply cutting off all of my emotions just because they were too much for me to handle at the time. Even though it sounded like the easiest way around the pain, ending my life wasn’t an option. I couldn’t eat. I couldn’t sleep. I couldn’t smile. I couldn’t think, or hear, or even breathe normally. And I let that stay that way for quite a while (3 weeks or so). It was a dark, cold, lonely moment for me, and I tried in every way I knew how to “fix” myself from feeling so horribly. I did lots of crazy stuff, like dousing myself in Essential Oils, exercise, reading the Bible, spiritual passages, writing, watching motivational videos, empowerment videos, listened to empowering music, sleeping, breaking stuff… yelling, crying, etc.), and no matter what I did I couldn’t escape from it. So I embraced it.

I decided I would feel every bit of it. All the sadness, all the feelings of betrayal, all the pain, all the tightness in the chest, the pounding heart, the crushed soul, the shock, disbelief, the doubt, curiosity, the lump in the throat. I would intentionally take it all in and embrace it. “THIS is what everyone feels when they experience this kind of stuff,” I told myself. “It’s normal, and although it isn’t anything I would wish on anyone, I will walk through this fire with my head high, brave, fearless, and ultimately, a better person.”

Motorcycle Details

Slowly, each feeling dissipated. Anger was the first to leave. Fear was next. Sadness is on the recession but still there. And that’s fine. For now. Slowly, I started noticing that all the things that made me happy were still there (I had just forgotten about them because I was so focused on the bad stuff). My favorite green rolling hills covered in yellow madia flowers and grazing horses were always right there, every day, on my commute to work. My son was always there, ready to read a book and talk a little before bed. My puppies were always there, wagging their tail and following me around the house, full of happiness for just being next to me. My heart was beating. And while my health has now been compromised, I’m alive and still full of every opportunity I’ve ever had before in life. And… my friends were still there, ready to listen to anything and help me through it. I wasn’t alone, never was, and never will be.

It isn’t that optimist crap, or me pretending that the problem isn’t there. This is me harnessing the power of pulling positive energy from the infinite abundant source of “positive energy” to replace the “negative energy” that was clouding my personal world and (what felt like) was sucking me of my soul and devouring me alive.

You see, the more I remembered and looked for those things that brought me happiness (or good feelings), the less “bad” I felt about what had happened. And the less bad I felt, and more genuinely “happy” I felt about other areas in my life, the more empowered I was, the more courage I had to move forward. My appetite slowly came back. My smile would show up every now and then. And eventually, I remembered how to laugh again and be silly. I was able to look at the person who had caused the pain and not feel anger. I accepted I had no control over what had happened. It happened…. More importantly, I realized that happened didn’t happen TO me. It was simply, an experience, that invoked a roller coaster of emotions, and thus many energies as well. It doesn’t make it right what happened. No, it was totally wrong. It was horrible, and appropriate steps have been taken to “right the wrong”.

But the point is, bad stuff happens to everyone, anywhere, all the time and it sucks. It truly, deeply sucks really, really bad. But it doesn’t have to suck forever, and you will feel better. When you’re ready. And the feelings and emotions that you are experiencing because of all that crappy stuff is, unfortunately, yours and yours alone. You gotta take that responsibility for it…even though (I know!) we’d rather give that job to someone else).

Maybe not the greatest example, but that, in a nutshell, is negative and positive energy.